British Archaeological Jobs & Resources

Develop your skillbase BAJR.

Training Opportunities & Courses.

This section provides details and links to formal and informal courses in the UK


First Steps in Archaeology Canterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 24th March 2018
   Introductory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day.

First Steps in ArchaeologyCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 13th January 2018
   Introductory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day.

Who do we think we are? The archaeology of migration, nationality and ethnicityCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 10th March 2017
   General Interest
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)

Modern humans first ventured out of Africa around 100,000 years ago, into a world already populated by earlier species such as Neanderthals. Since that time, the human race has divided and defined itself along lines of race, culture, religion, language or nation. Tribalism seems to be deeply embedded in the human psyche. The concept of ethnicity has developed to define distinct groups that share a common culture, religion, language or national identity, whilst the migration of groups, in the past and the present, is often a source of conflict, but also of rapid and dynamic change, for better or for worse.

Migration and identity have often been a focus of interest for archaeologists and historians, not always with positive results. And with the widespread popularity of inexpensive DNA testing, growing numbers of people are now being provided with data that aims to provide a detailed break-down of their own genetic history.

With such topics remaining as contentious as ever, this course explores and discusses these issues from an archaeological perspective, with a focus on what archaeological evidence can contribute to our understanding of human ethnic identity and migration. Topics covered include: the migration of modern humans out of Africa; evidence for migration in the archaeological record; the cultural impact of migration; migration as an explanation for change; evidence from ancient DNA; interpreting modern DNA sampling; ethnicity as an aspect of human identity. Whether you consider yourself a Citizen of the World or a confirmed Brexiteer, come along and join a lively discussion about who you, and we, really are.


Putting colour in the past: an introduction to environmental archaeologyCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Friday 2nd to Sunday 4th March 2018
   CPD/Training
   £180 (£175 Friends of CAT)

The study of plant and animal remains from archaeological deposits can provide many insights into the lifestyle and diet of past human societies, their use of local land and resources, and ancient environments. The first part of this three-day course will focus on the types of remains that can be preserved on archaeological sites and how they are recovered. Instruction will be given in the taking and processing of environmental samples, followed by a session sorting dried sample residues that will introduce some of the more commonly recovered remains.

The second and third days will provide more detail on the study of bones of fish, bird and mammals, invertebrates and charred plant remains, mainly using examples from CAT sites. This will include hands-on sessions with a variety of remains. The course will conclude with examples of how combining information from various sources can be used to visualise ancient environments.

DAY 1

During the day participants will find out:

  • what environmental archaeology is;
  • how animal and plant remains preserved on archaeological sites can provide insights into ancient environments and human lifestyle;
  • how the type of sediment in which remains are buried influences what may be preserved;
  • what remains are likely to be found in particular features and deposits;
  • why, where, and how to take samples.

PRACTICAL SESSIONS
Bulk sample processing and sorting dried sample residues to extract biological remains and artefacts.

DAY 2

  • Investigating what vertebrate remains can tell you about the past, including examples from CAT sites.
  • Insect remains.

PRACTICAL SESSIONS
With vertebrate and insect remains.

DAY 3

  • Investigating charred plant remains.
  • Use of indicator groups.
  • Multi-proxy studies to visualise ancient environments.

PRACTICAL SESSION
With charred plant remains.


Understanding and recording stratigraphyCanterbury Archaeological Trust`

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 24th February 2018
   CPD
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
An understanding of stratigraphy and the concept of ‘context’ is essential to anyone undertaking archaeological excavation. This course will provide clear instruction on both the theory of stratigraphy and practical ways in which it can be effectively recognised, recorded and interpreted. Practical exercises will lead students through such tasks as completing a context sheet, drawing plans and sections, completing stratigraphic matrices and using site records to create sets, groups and phases.

Medieval and Tudor CanterburyCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 17th February 2018
   General Interest
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Drawing on work previously undertaken by the Trust and documentary sources, this one-day course will provide students with the opportunity to explore Canterbury’s development from the Black Death (c.1350) to the Reformation (c.1550). This period witnessed a resurgence of pilgrimage and its dramatic ending, the building of great inns and the introduction of such features as chimneys, and considerable changes to the lives of ordinary townsfolk at work, at play and in their religious worship. Through a combination of lectures and workshops, students will learn about the city, its citizens and their communities of ward and parish, as well as having the opportunity to work with a range of primary sources.

The Archaeology of DeathCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 3rd and Sunday 4th February 2018
   CPD (2 days)
   £80 (£75 Friends of CAT)
This two-day course will provide an introduction to the excavation, recording, analysis and interpretation of funerary remains. Students will be instructed in the handling and care of human skeletal material by an osteologist. The course will also explore the place of cemeteries and monuments in the wider landscape and the study of funerary assemblages as a whole, including graves, grave structures and fittings, grave goods and evidence associated with cremations. Emphasis will be placed on how to view all these elements as the visible remains of funeral ceremonies and on how we can seek to reconstruct those ceremonies as fully as possible.

Archaeological Report WritingCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 20th January 2018
   CPD
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
This course will provide a step-by-step guide to the preparation and writing of archaeological reports, covering the key information that should be included. Students will be introduced to the different levels of archaeological reports, from reports of negative results, through interim, assessment, analysis and publication reports. The course will also explore the different options for publication and dissemination, including ‘grey literature’, online, journal articles and monographs. Templates for different types of reports will be provided, along with examples of short reports.

My place in history: an introduction to Desk Based ArchaeologyCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 6th January 2018
   Introductory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
This one-day course introduces the art of desk-based archaeological study, guiding students in researching into the history of where they live, or another chosen location in the UK. We’ll be looking primarily at how to build and understand the historical and archaeological narrative of a place using the large number of web-resources now freely available, but there will also be pointers on how to develop a study by visiting archives, for example. By the end of the course, all in attendance should have the confidence and resources to conduct their own desk-based research into the historic environment, and communicate their findings.

Roman pottery: an introductionCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 2nd December 2017
   Introdutory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Pottery is one of the key types of evidence recovered by archaeologists, crucial not just as a tool for dating but also as evidence of the types of activity at a site, and for trade between sites and regions. This course will provide an introduction to the identification and study of Roman pottery. Drawing upon CAT’s pottery fabric series and extensive collections, students will be guided through the main types of Roman pottery found in Britain, including both imported wares, the major Romano-British industries, and locally produced wares.

Pottery identification: a beginner's guideCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 25th November 2017
   Introductory course
   £45 (£40 for Friends of CAT)
Drawing on the Trust’s extensive collections of material excavated from Canterbury sites and elsewhere in Kent, we will be illustrating some of the key developments in ceramic technologies and styles from the prehistoric to post-medieval periods in Britain. The day will include a series of presentations and opportunities to handle, examine and compare pottery from the principal periods of the past three millennia. By the end of the day we hope you will be able to recognise some key differences between pottery types – and that you will also have learnt something about the difficulties involved in identifying and dating archaeological ceramics.

Medieval East KentCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 18th November 2017
   General Interest
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
East Kent was important in the story of medieval England, and this course will take a fresh look at the archaeology of the area dating from the Norman Conquest through to the early Tudor period. Through a series of lectures, the course will cover a number of urban case studies over time, including Canterbury and important Cinque Ports in the vicinity, and also rural lives. An underlying principle of the course is to begin to understand both the formative, and the distinctly ‘foreign’, aspects of local medieval life at a turning point in history.

Dark Age Canterbury: the death and rebirth of a cityCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 4th November 2017
   General Interest
   £45.00 (£40.00 Friends of CAT)
In the last years of Roman Britain the city of Durovernum appears to have undergone rapid collapse, with bodies remaining unburied and the streets becoming choked with debris. By the late fourth or early fifth century, it may have largely ceased to function as an urban centre. Yet, by the end of the sixth century, the place that would become the city of Canterbury was again a centre of power, this time for the Kentish royal dynasty and the newly arrived Christian church. This course will explore in detail how this sudden death and rebirth of a city took place, drawing on historical and archaeological evidence, including over four decades of work by Canterbury Archaeological Trust. Much of the archaeological evidence is yet to be fully published, and throws new light on this dark and seismic period in the story of Canterbury.

Durovernon and Durovernum: Iron Age and early Roman CanterburyCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU.       Saturday 21st October 2017
   General Interest
   £45.00 (£40.00 Friends of CAT)
Investigating the origins of Canterbury, one of the first towns in Britain, starting from an Iron Age centre with probable religious significance and going through numerous changes to become the late Roman town which bequeathed its form to later versions of the city. This is a 500 year story which we now begin to understand in far greater detail through recent finds of superb archaeological evidence.

Roman Britain and the Romano-BritishCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 7th October 2017
   General Interest
   £45.00 (£40.00 Friends of CAT)
Strange as it may seem, there were never that many Romans, relatively speaking, in Roman Britain! There were always many more people we would now call ‘Romano-British’, people of often native descent who, over half a millennium, formulated their own versions of ‘Romaness’ in all areas of life. Actual Romans, themselves an increasingly mixed bunch, might have seen many of these provincial attempts to ‘fit in’ as quite a joke! From our point of view, it is the (often regionally varied) mix of cultural traits that makes the study of the Romano-British, the real people of Roman Britain, so fascinating.

Supporting history in the Primary SchoolCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury       Tuesday 3rd October 2017
   Education Training
   £80.00 (£75.00 Friends of CAT)

If you are an EYFS, KS 1 or KS 2 teacher, History Co-ordinator, home schooler, or History/Archaeology club leader, there should be something of interest for you on this interactive day course.

We will be looking at:

  • how Archaeology and artefacts (or more correctly ‘finds’ ) can support History and cross-curricular teaching and learning in your classroom;
  • our extensive range of handling collections for loan county-wide plus digital materials;
  • recent resources to support Local Studies or elements of British History featuring the Dover Bronze Age Boat, Folkestone’s Vanishing Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon Lyminge;
  • using toys and stories to develop History skills in very young children and help meet Early Learning Goals.

Tutor: Marion Green.
Marion is CAT’s Education Officer. She is experienced in working with primary school pupils and teachers in Kent and with student teachers in training at Canterbury Christ Church University.


Prehistoric KentCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury, CT1 2LU.       Saturday 30th September 2017
   General Interest
   £45.00 (£40.00 Friends of CAT)
This one-day course will cover the prehistory of Kent, a period of over half a million years. The course will trace the development of the Kentish landscape itself from the Palaeolithic (Old Stone Age) onwards, including the formation of the Channel and the severing of the last land-bridge to the Continent. The introduction of farming, along with the creation of monuments, changing attitudes to and treatment of the dead, introduction of metal working and other technologies, and development of settlements, long distance links, and society will be among the many topics considered. The course will be illustrated with case studies and finds drawn from the Trust’s archives.

First Steps In ArchaeologyCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury, CT1 2LU.       Saturday 23rd September 2017
   Introduction to archaeology
   £45.00 (£40.00 Friends of CAT)
Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day. This popular course is repeated in January and March.

We Dig the Castle Trent and Peak Archaeology, Historic England, and Nottingham City Council

   Nottingham       Monday 17 July - Friday 18 August (weekdays)
   Fieldschool/ training excavation
   Varies by duration and eligibility for discounts
We Dig the Castle 2017 – Nottingham Castle, England
17 July – 18 August
 
We Dig the Castle offers a variety of courses, ranging from a 1 or 2 day taster to a 1-5 week study place. A changing daily programme of induction, skills tutorials, task-based workshops, and excavation allows trainees to develop and practice skills in a variety of areas, and to chart how their abilities have developed.  
 
It returns for 2017 on weekdays between 17 July and 18 August, with a family day on 22 July and a Saturday training session on 5 August.
 
Weekday training sessions include: http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gif
Principles of excavation: stratigraphy and contexts http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gif
Excavation techniques  http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gif
Site recording: planning, levelling, section drawing, photography and context description  http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gif
Survey & laser scanning  http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gif
Post-excavation and processing  http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gif
Organic and inorganic finds
http://tparchaeology.co.uk/index_htm_files/0.gifEnvironmental evidence and samples, including flotation
 
You’ll work with experienced field archaeologists from Trent & Peak Archaeology, including our Community Archaeologist. A variety of experts from both Trent & Peak Archaeology and the wider archaeological community will join us for specialist tutorials and workshops.   
 
The team: We Dig the Castle is the ideal opportunity to develop your archaeological skills, particularly if you are working towards (or have) a qualification. We offer a supportive, small-group, environment with high staff to trainee ratios. Trainees will work alongside professional archaeologists from Trent & Peak Archaeology and join in workshops and tutorials delivered by subject specialists.
 
We have an established reputation and strong working relationships with a number of archaeology departments, and are experienced in completing the placement journals that may be required by your university. In 2015 and 2016 students from universities from across the UK and from abroad came to train with We Dig the Castle.  
 
The site: This is a unique chance to be part of an excavation of a Scheduled Ancient Monument, on a site famous across the world. This is your opportunity to discover an almost unknown area of Nottingham Castle. 2017 trainees will be excavating at a new lower level, with the possibility of uncovering the castle's first evidence of the English Civil War.
 
Find out more: tparchaeology.co.uk/wedigthecastle.htm
Contact: Alison, on 011 44 8967400 or at nottinghamcastle@yorkat.co.uk
Book online: YAT.digitickets.co.uk
 

Letter Cutting in StoneCambrian Archaeological Projects and The Wilderness Trust

   Llanidloes, mid-Wales       23-26 June 2017
   Hand-on letter cutting in stone
   £250
A hands-on four-day coruse in carving lettering in stone at Old Chapel Farm under the expert guidance of John Neilson.
This workshop will be principally about carving but will also look at aspects of designing lettering for stone.  Participants will learn to carve their own desins using traditional hand hand tools. We will also look at the background to the craft, and examples of work by present-day practitioners.
Letter cutting in stoneDSC_2947
The course is suitable for all ages, whether you are a beginner to letter cutting or professional.
Teaching: 10am Friday to 4pm Monday.
Course fee: £250 per person (includes all materials and luches).
For more details and accommodation options contact kevi: kevin@cambarch.co.uk
 

Making the Most of LidarPTS Consultancy (with Air Photo Services)

   Swindon       29th June 2017
   GIS and Data Management Skills (CIFA Accredited CPD)
   £150

Want to make use of all that lovely free Environment Agency lidar data but don't know where to start? Our CIFA accredited Making the Most of Lidar day course is just the ticket!

Run by professionals with many years experience in using lidar data for historic landscape analysis, this course covers essential concepts needed to integrate lidar data into your workflows. Through a series of presentations, practical guidance and hands on sessions this course will explore how to access, prepare, and manipulate digital lidar data. We’ll be covering current best practise for visualising the data as well as lots of practical exercises, because we believe that learning by doing is best.


Lidar at the Desk and in the FieldPTS Consultancy (with Air Photo Services)

   Swindon       29th-30th June 2017
   GIS and Data Managment, Field Survey Skills (CIFA Accredited)
   £250

This 2-day course complements the Making the Most of Lidar course presentations and practicals on day one with the option to spend the day out on site, putting your new-found lidar interpretation skills into practice!

On day 1 you'll learn all about lidar through a series of presentations, practical guidance and hands on sessions this course will explore how to access, prepare, and manipulate digital lidar data. We’ll be covering current best practise for visualising the data as well as lots of practical exercises.

On day 2 we will explore a landscape within 1hr of Swindon and make field observations of a range of features identified in the lidar data processed on day one. This exercise in taking observations from desk to field greatly enhances the interpretation of the data, leading to improved understanding of what can (and cannot) be identified using lidar. There will be lots of opportunity to discuss ideas and issues faced when combining remote data and field observations.

Visit our website for more information and to book your place! www.pushingthesensors.com/training


Exploring PalaeoenvironmentsUniversity of Sheffield, Zooarchaeology, Archaeobotany and Geoarchaeology research teams

   Department of Archaeology, North Gate House, Sheffield       14-15 September 2017
   Introductory
   £120.00 Student / Unwaged Rate; £180.00 Standard Rate.

The Exploring Palaeoenvironments short course runs for the second time this year and is the result of the joint efforts of zooarchaeologists, archaeobotanists and geoarchaeologists from our department.

The geological evidence and the organic remains recovered from archaeological sites are complementary indicators of the environmental conditions faced by past communities; when these indicators are thoroughly analysed and integrated, they have the potential of providing a detailed reconstruction of the environment and landscape in which people lived and moved.

The course will introduce participants to the different approaches and types of analyses employed by specialists of these related sub-disciplines. Each session will include theoretical lectures and case-studies; in addition, practical classes will provide direct experience of handling, analysing and interpreting the material evidence that archaeologists usually deal with.  The Exploring Palaeoenvironments short course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts alike and does not require any previous knowledge of the disciplines covered.


Understanding Zooarchaeology IIUniversity of Sheffield, Zooarchaeology research team

   Department of Archaeology, Northgate House, Sheffield       11-13 September 2017
   Advanced
   £140.00 Student / Unwaged Rate; £200.00 Standard Rate

The Understanding Zooarchaeology II short course has previously run twice, receiving excellent feedback. This year the course will last three days, and will be ideal for those who already have a basic knowledge of Zooarchaeology and want to learn more.

The aim of this advanced course is to give participants direct experience in analysing and recording faunal assemblages from archaeological sites. It will also provide participants with experience in practising with the most specialized issues of the discipline such as identification of sheep from goat and deer from cattle.

Sessions include brief theoretical lessons, followed by dedicated practical activity. During the practical activities and the recording assemblage practical session, several specialist and expert zooarchaeologists will supervise the class, in order to provide participants with experience of the whole range of knowledge and skills required by the discipline. Case-studies are included and a special session of ‘question and answers’ will serve to sum up the day and clarify doubts. 
At the end of the three days, participants are encouraged to write a zooarchaeological report based on the material analysed during the course, which will receive a feedback from an expert zooarchaeologist.

Understanding Zooarchaeology II is suitable for anyone who has already attended our Understanding Zooarchaeology I course, or who already has a basic knowledge of zooarchaeological methods.


Heritage Values and the Assessment of SignificanceOxford University Dept for Continuing Education

   Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA       Wednesday 5-Friday 7 July 2017
   3 day cpd
   £455
Significance is now a core concept within our planning process.  Its assessment is a key part of management and of development within the historic environment.  This course will introduce the process, show you what is involved in preparing assessments of significance, teach you how to read and judge such assessments, and explore the ways in which they can be used.  At the end, you should be convinced about the value of significance as a planning and management tool!
The course will be open to all, but will be of particular interest to heritage asset managers and advisers, planners, historic environment professionals and architects, surveyors and others who do not specialise in heritage but may need to understand heritage assessments and their value in guiding change
Course Director: Stephen Bond, Director of Heritage Places and joint author of Managing Built Heritage
Course Co-Director: Henry Russell, Course Director of the programme in Conservation of the Historic Environment, Reading University

Archaeological Writing for PublicationOxford University Dept for Continuing Education

   Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA       Monday 26 June 2017
   One day cpd
   £215
Writing a good and publishable report is a key skill for archaeologists, but one that can be particularly challenging and hard to learn. This course will introduce the standard types of published reports currently produced by archaeologists, and how the scope and content of a report is planned. The course will then focus on two key components, the stratigraphic narrative and the discussion, and the most effective and successful ways of approaching the planning, writing and illustration of these. This will include a critical review of a number of examples, to identify common mistakes and how to avoid them. We will also look at the special requirements that apply to writing in a professional and academic context. The course is taught by specialists with many years’ experience in writing, editing and managing archaeological reports. It is designed for all those in both the professional and voluntary archaeological sectors who need to develop skills and confidence in report writing. The course will involve some preparatory reading before the training day.
Course Director: Elizabeth Popescu, Post-Excavation and Publications Manager, Oxford Archaeology East
Tutor: Rachel Clarke, Post-Excavation Editor, Oxford Archaeology East
 

Understanding Place: Historic Area AssessmentOxford University Dept for Continuing Education

   Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA       Tuesday 20-Wednesday 21 June 2017
   2 day cpd
   £375
Historic Area Assessments aim to ensure that historical understanding informs the management of change in the built environment not just at the level of individual buildings but across the small and medium-scale historic landscapes that constitute ‘places’, particularly when these are threatened by rapid change or steady incremental loss. They provide an overview of the historical development and present-day character of towns, suburbs and rural settlements and an assessment of their current state and future value. This course will introduce the principles and methods of area assessments, allow participants to explore the approach through a practical exercise and illustrate ways in which it can lead to appropriate strategies for management, conservation and protection. 
It will be useful to those who are, or are likely to be, involved in the preparation, commissioning or use of Historic Area Assessments in a wide range of contexts, including the preparation of Masterplans, Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Plans, Heritage Partnership Agreements and the strategic management of the built heritage.
Course Director: Adam Menuge, University of Cambridge
Tutor: Marion Barter, Architectural History Practice
 

Photographing Historic BuildingsOxford University Dept for Continuing Education

   Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA       Wednesday 7 June 2017
   One day practical
   £230
Digital cameras have greatly changed the way we record our architectural history, simplifying the process and reducing the cost of image capture, thereby encouraging a scatter-gun method of photography. This course will look at ways of taking a more considered approach to the use of our cameras and what we seek to capture. The course is aimed at those who are not professional photographers but have an interest in or need to photograph historic buildings for the record using a digital camera. By the end of the course students will be expected to know how to choose the right viewpoint, the right lighting conditions, correctly set up their own cameras to capture suitable images and how to post-produce images in software so that they will create images ready for the archive.
Course Director: Steve Cole, architectural photographer and author of Photographing Historic Buildings with a Digital Camera (Historic England, 2017)
Tutor: Derek Kendall, architectural and fine art photographer
 

Advanced Lidar for Historic Environment ProfessionalsPTS Consultancy (with Air Photo Services)

   Swindon       12-13th October 2017
   Advanced GIS and Data Management, 2-day course
   £500

If you're looking to take full advantage of the recent release of the Environment Agency point cloud data, this 2-day course covers every step from point cloud to 3D visualisation. Taught through a mixture of presentations, practical guidance and hands on sessions, our advanced lidar course is aimed at those who want to improve their understanding of how the data can be processed and shared with clients.

Over two days we’ll cover the following topics:

  • Introduction to the point cloud – formats and attributes
  • Viewing and assessing the quality of point cloud data using LAStools
  • Classifying the point cloud
  • Generating terrain and intensity raster
  • Generating mask layers
  • Viewing the point-cloud in QGIS
  • Advanced raster processing in QGIS with GRASS and SAGA
  • 3D visualisations to share with colleagues and clients

PTS Consultancy and Air Photo Services will be running this course just once in 2017, so visit our website for more information and to book your place!


Discovering Dorchester Archaeological Field SchoolUniversity of Oxford and Oxford Archaeology

   Dorchester on Thames, Oxfordshire       25th June - 21st July
   Archaeological Field School
   £250 - £600

2017 will see the Discovering Dorchester team return to the Dorchester on Thames allotments trench to continue down through the archaeology of the Roman ‘small town.’ Dorchester is a key site in English, and indeed British, history, being one of few sites in the country where settlements dating from the late Iron Age (100 BC – AD 43), the Roman, and the Anglo-Saxon periods can be explored, largely unobscured by later development.

A two-week undergraduate field school and two one-week public field schools will give participants the chance to work on an active research project, whilst being given tuition in all key practical archaeological skills. These will include excavating and recording by context, drawing sections and plans, using a Dumpy Level and Total Station, archaeological photography, and washing and processing ‘bulk’ and ‘small-finds’. These skills will be taught in group sessions and individually by experienced supervisors. There will also be seminars given on other aspects of excavation by experts, on topics such as stratigraphy, animal bone and pottery analysis, and the wider archaeology and history of the region, to put the site in context.

BAJR Archaeology Skills Passports are available and you will get the chance to complete various key skills with us. 


East Wear Bay Archaeological Field SchoolCanterbury Archaeological Trust

   East Wear Bay, Folkestone, Kent       10th July-5th August 2017
   Field School
   £65-£720

East Wear Bay Field School is running for a third year at the impressive site located on top of the cliff overlooking East Wear Bay in Folkestone, Kent, right on the edge of the Dover-Folkestone Heritage Coast. ?Unfortunately the area is prone to erosion and with it goes the archaeology on top of the cliff. We are currently running an archaeological field school to record the archaeological remains at the site before they are lost forever. 

The site has long been known as a Roman Villa. Our work has revealed that it was also a late Iron Age trading settlement, as well as the production site for a major industry producing querns from the local sandstone. This site has fast become recognised as an important national and international site - and there is still much more left to discover.

Training sessions are currently in 1,2,3 or 4 week blocks. You will be trained by professional archaeologists from Canterbury Archaeological Trust, and our training is evidenced by the BAJR Skills Passport. You will have the opportunity to be involved in all aspects of an archaeological excavation, including recording, surveying, and finds processing. Additionally you have the chance to engage in some public outreach as our site is open to the public daily.

If you aren't able to commit to a full week we are offering one day experiences where we will give you a taste of what archaeology is about. We will give you a tour of the site, you will have a go at excavating an archaeological feature, and in the afternoon you will be able to process your finds if you wish.

Further details can be found on the website.     http://www.eastwearbay.co.uk

Come and join us in our third season to discover more about the archaeology of this incredible site!




If there is anything you want to knowabout courses, please call me on 0787 6528 498 or 01620 861643 or email me at - info@bajr.org