British Archaeological Jobs & Resources

Develop your skillbase BAJR.

Training Opportunities & Courses.

This section provides details and links to formal and informal courses in the UK


Archaeological Illustration: Pottery Study Day

The Sussex School of Archaeology                Saturday 27th January 2018
   Rottingdean Whiteway Centre       Saturday 27th January 2018
   Post Excavation
   £25
ROTTINGDEAN WHITEWAY CENTRE & SUSSEX SCHOOL OF ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOLOGICAL ILLUSTRATION:  POTTERY
STUDY DAY
Saturday 27th January 2018, 10am-4pm.
Tutor: Jane Russell B.A., M.A. (former Senior Illustrator at Archaeology South-East)
The day will cover basic pottery drawing in pencil, using traditional archaeological conventions.  These drawings can be used for later inking up by pen or drawing through a computer programme (neither inking up nor computer programmes are covered in the course).   The day will start with an introductory tutorial, followed by students experimenting with their own drawings. We will draw whole and decorated pots, and sherds.   The course is suitable for all abilities, whether beginners or those with some experience who wish to brush up on their skills.
Equipment for the course
Please do not buy any expensive drawing equipment as the tutor will provide the basic drawing equipment, but if you do have any of the following please bring them along:
A3 Drawing board with metric graph paper on it    
2H pencils, rubber, ruler, callipers, dividers, masking tape
Cheap A4 copy paper to draw on                                                                                                                   
Any pottery that you wish to draw that is no larger than an A4 sheet
Refreshments and Lunch
Tea, coffee and biscuits provided through the day.  You are welcome to bring your own packed lunch or to obtain lunch at one of the many nearby village pubs or cafes.
Venue: Rottingdean Whiteway Centre, Whiteway Lane, Rottingdean, BN2 7HB
Fee: £25. To book please email MikeGregory@rwc.org.uk  OR  phone 07913 753 493.
www.rwc.org.uk; www.sussexarchaeology.org 

 

Archaeological Excavation and Recording

Achill Archaeological Field School                21 May - 7 September 2018
   Dooagh, Achill Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland       21 May - 7 September 2018
   Field School
   €695 to €4, 500
We plan to run two projects in 2018:

1. Keem Bay - May & June 2018
The village of Keem was in existence from the mid eighteenth century and possibly earlier.  The village met its tragic demise during the great Irish famine (1845-52).   Three dwellings have been excavated at Keem. This on-going research provides an unparalleled glimpse  into everyday life in preFamine Ireland, and offers a significant challenge to popular perceptions of the period. In 2018 we will excavate a house that we argue lies in the oldest part of the village.

2. Caraun Point - July & August
We will begin an exciting new excavation at Caraun Point, a sand-covered peninsula jutting into the Atlantic Ocean.  The site is well known for its archeological remains, including an early medieval enclosure, a childrens' burial ground, shell middens and several stone buildings of unknown date eroding out of the sand dunes.

Contact: info@achill-fieldschool.com 

Understanding Zooarchaeology I

University of Sheffield, Department of Archaeology                17th-19th January 2018
   Sheffield, South Yorkshire       17th-19th January 2018
   introductory course to Zooarchaeology
   £180 (£120 for students/unwaged)
Animal bones and teeth are among the most common remains found on archaeological sites, and this three-day course will provide participants with an understanding of the basic methods that zooarchaeologists use to understand animal bone evidence. During this course participants will begin to develop the skills necessary to: understand the principles of excavating animal bones; care for and store bones after excavation; identify different species from their bones and teeth; age and sex bones; recognize taphonomy, butchery and pathology; understand how zooarchaeological material is analysed and quantified; interpret site reports and zooarchaeological literature. The course is directed to students, professionals and enthusiasts and does not require any previous knowledge of the discipline. The teaching will be delivered through short lectures, hands-on practical activities and case studies.

The Newport Ship: Excavation, Recording and Conservation

Nautical Archaeology Society                23-24 September 2017
   Medieval Ship Centre, Newport, NP19 4SP       23-24 September 2017
   Excavation, Recording and Conservation
   £150.10 (discount for NAS members)
Looking for some interesting and useful CPD?
Come to the Nautical Archaeology Society's weekend course at the Newport Ship and learn about - 
- laser scanning and contact digitising with FARO equipment
- specialist analysis of artefacts and environmental evidence
- Cleaning and wet & dry storage
- Handling and moving timbers
- CAD modelling
- Archiving
Only a few places available so book online now!

First Steps in Archaeology

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 24th March 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 24th March 2018
   Introductory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day.

First Steps in Archaeology

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 13th January 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 13th January 2018
   Introductory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day.

Who do we think we are? The archaeology of migration, nationality and ethnicity

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 10th March 2017
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 10th March 2017
   General Interest
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)

Modern humans first ventured out of Africa around 100,000 years ago, into a world already populated by earlier species such as Neanderthals. Since that time, the human race has divided and defined itself along lines of race, culture, religion, language or nation. Tribalism seems to be deeply embedded in the human psyche. The concept of ethnicity has developed to define distinct groups that share a common culture, religion, language or national identity, whilst the migration of groups, in the past and the present, is often a source of conflict, but also of rapid and dynamic change, for better or for worse.

Migration and identity have often been a focus of interest for archaeologists and historians, not always with positive results. And with the widespread popularity of inexpensive DNA testing, growing numbers of people are now being provided with data that aims to provide a detailed break-down of their own genetic history.

With such topics remaining as contentious as ever, this course explores and discusses these issues from an archaeological perspective, with a focus on what archaeological evidence can contribute to our understanding of human ethnic identity and migration. Topics covered include: the migration of modern humans out of Africa; evidence for migration in the archaeological record; the cultural impact of migration; migration as an explanation for change; evidence from ancient DNA; interpreting modern DNA sampling; ethnicity as an aspect of human identity. Whether you consider yourself a Citizen of the World or a confirmed Brexiteer, come along and join a lively discussion about who you, and we, really are.


Putting colour in the past: an introduction to environmental archaeology

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Friday 2nd to Sunday 4th March 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Friday 2nd to Sunday 4th March 2018
   CPD/Training
   £180 (£175 Friends of CAT)

The study of plant and animal remains from archaeological deposits can provide many insights into the lifestyle and diet of past human societies, their use of local land and resources, and ancient environments. The first part of this three-day course will focus on the types of remains that can be preserved on archaeological sites and how they are recovered. Instruction will be given in the taking and processing of environmental samples, followed by a session sorting dried sample residues that will introduce some of the more commonly recovered remains.

The second and third days will provide more detail on the study of bones of fish, bird and mammals, invertebrates and charred plant remains, mainly using examples from CAT sites. This will include hands-on sessions with a variety of remains. The course will conclude with examples of how combining information from various sources can be used to visualise ancient environments.

DAY 1

During the day participants will find out:

  • what environmental archaeology is;
  • how animal and plant remains preserved on archaeological sites can provide insights into ancient environments and human lifestyle;
  • how the type of sediment in which remains are buried influences what may be preserved;
  • what remains are likely to be found in particular features and deposits;
  • why, where, and how to take samples.

PRACTICAL SESSIONS
Bulk sample processing and sorting dried sample residues to extract biological remains and artefacts.

DAY 2

  • Investigating what vertebrate remains can tell you about the past, including examples from CAT sites.
  • Insect remains.

PRACTICAL SESSIONS
With vertebrate and insect remains.

DAY 3

  • Investigating charred plant remains.
  • Use of indicator groups.
  • Multi-proxy studies to visualise ancient environments.

PRACTICAL SESSION
With charred plant remains.


Understanding and recording stratigraphy

Canterbury Archaeological Trust`                Saturday 24th February 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 24th February 2018
   CPD
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
An understanding of stratigraphy and the concept of ‘context’ is essential to anyone undertaking archaeological excavation. This course will provide clear instruction on both the theory of stratigraphy and practical ways in which it can be effectively recognised, recorded and interpreted. Practical exercises will lead students through such tasks as completing a context sheet, drawing plans and sections, completing stratigraphic matrices and using site records to create sets, groups and phases.

Medieval and Tudor Canterbury

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 17th February 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 17th February 2018
   General Interest
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Drawing on work previously undertaken by the Trust and documentary sources, this one-day course will provide students with the opportunity to explore Canterbury’s development from the Black Death (c.1350) to the Reformation (c.1550). This period witnessed a resurgence of pilgrimage and its dramatic ending, the building of great inns and the introduction of such features as chimneys, and considerable changes to the lives of ordinary townsfolk at work, at play and in their religious worship. Through a combination of lectures and workshops, students will learn about the city, its citizens and their communities of ward and parish, as well as having the opportunity to work with a range of primary sources.

The Archaeology of Death

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 3rd and Sunday 4th February 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 3rd and Sunday 4th February 2018
   CPD (2 days)
   £80 (£75 Friends of CAT)
This two-day course will provide an introduction to the excavation, recording, analysis and interpretation of funerary remains. Students will be instructed in the handling and care of human skeletal material by an osteologist. The course will also explore the place of cemeteries and monuments in the wider landscape and the study of funerary assemblages as a whole, including graves, grave structures and fittings, grave goods and evidence associated with cremations. Emphasis will be placed on how to view all these elements as the visible remains of funeral ceremonies and on how we can seek to reconstruct those ceremonies as fully as possible.

Archaeological Report Writing

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 20th January 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 20th January 2018
   CPD
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
This course will provide a step-by-step guide to the preparation and writing of archaeological reports, covering the key information that should be included. Students will be introduced to the different levels of archaeological reports, from reports of negative results, through interim, assessment, analysis and publication reports. The course will also explore the different options for publication and dissemination, including ‘grey literature’, online, journal articles and monographs. Templates for different types of reports will be provided, along with examples of short reports.

My place in history: an introduction to Desk Based Archaeology

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 6th January 2018
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 6th January 2018
   Introductory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
This one-day course introduces the art of desk-based archaeological study, guiding students in researching into the history of where they live, or another chosen location in the UK. We’ll be looking primarily at how to build and understand the historical and archaeological narrative of a place using the large number of web-resources now freely available, but there will also be pointers on how to develop a study by visiting archives, for example. By the end of the course, all in attendance should have the confidence and resources to conduct their own desk-based research into the historic environment, and communicate their findings.

Roman pottery: an introduction

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 2nd December 2017
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 2nd December 2017
   Introdutory
   £45 (£40 Friends of CAT)
Pottery is one of the key types of evidence recovered by archaeologists, crucial not just as a tool for dating but also as evidence of the types of activity at a site, and for trade between sites and regions. This course will provide an introduction to the identification and study of Roman pottery. Drawing upon CAT’s pottery fabric series and extensive collections, students will be guided through the main types of Roman pottery found in Britain, including both imported wares, the major Romano-British industries, and locally produced wares.

Pottery identification: a beginner's guide

Canterbury Archaeological Trust                Saturday 25th November 2017
   Canterbury Archaeological Trust, Canterbury. CT1 2LU       Saturday 25th November 2017
   Introductory course
   £45 (£40 for Friends of CAT)
Drawing on the Trust’s extensive collections of material excavated from Canterbury sites and elsewhere in Kent, we will be illustrating some of the key developments in ceramic technologies and styles from the prehistoric to post-medieval periods in Britain. The day will include a series of presentations and opportunities to handle, examine and compare pottery from the principal periods of the past three millennia. By the end of the day we hope you will be able to recognise some key differences between pottery types – and that you will also have learnt something about the difficulties involved in identifying and dating archaeological ceramics.



If there is anything you want to knowabout courses, please call me on 0787 6528 498 or 01368 840 847 or email me at - info@bajr.org