British Archaeological Jobs & Resources

Develop your skillbase BAJR.

Training Opportunities & Courses.

This section provides details and links to formal and informal courses in the UK


We Dig...Wollaton Park - Archaeological Training Dig

Trent and Peak Archaeology                13th July - 14th August (weekdays)
   Wollaton Park, Nottingham, NG8 2AE       13th July - 14th August (weekdays)
   Fieldschool
   £250 week (general) £225 week (concessions - see booking page). Taster days £50/£45
We Dig… Wollaton Park 2020 will continue archaeological investigations of the formal gardens of Wollaton Hall, built in 1580-1588 for Sir Francis Willoughby, searching for evidence of buildings and garden features depicted on 17th century paintings of the Hall and developing a new understanding of how the park might have looked in the post medieval period. 2020 trainees can look forward to a packed programme that will introduce and improve basic archaeological skills whilst providing the opportunity to expand their knowledge into other parts of the archaeological process, such as finds identification and, new for this year, archaeobotany. It’s not just about excavation!
 
Booking is now open for members of the community, students and budding trainee archaeologists from all backgrounds, aged 14-plus, to get involved in archaeological investigations uncovering new information about the history and archaeology of Wollaton Hall and its surrounding parkland landscape. Trainees can book on for any length of time from a one day tasters to the full five weeks, but a week long placement is recommended for trainees to take full advantage of the training programme.

More information can be found on the TPA website! Book online at https://yat.digitickets.co.uk/category/21269

Nottinghamshire Castles

Workers' Educational Association                From 14th April to 19th May 2020; 13.30-15.30
   Lowdham, Nottinghamshire       From 14th April to 19th May 2020; 13.30-15.30
   WEA Level 2
   £40

Taking into account the book Castles of Nottinghamshire, and over a decade of subsequent fieldwork and research, this course offers a detailed insight into a county that can offer Norman motte and bailey castles, a royal fortress, castles built for bishops, fortified manor houses and late mediaeval gatehouses.

Taught as discussion seminars, with the additional option of a field trip, over thirty Nottinghamshire sites will be placed in the wider context of mediaeval castle studies. Learners will engage with a variety of castles, great houses and palaces in order to understand their architectural and archaeological development from the Saxon period up until the English Civil War.

Course taught by James Wright of Triskele Heritage. at Women's Institute Hall, 1 Main Street, Lowdham, Nottinghamshire, NG14 7AB

Course dates
14/04/2020 - 19/05/2020
Session details
5 sessions for 2 hrs per session
Tue 13:30
Fees
£40.00  Includes accreditation & materials if applicable


British prehistoric rock art: a pictorial journey through archaeological time

Bristol Museums                25th April 2020
   M Shed, Bristol       25th April 2020
   Study Day
   £30/£35

Think of prehistoric rock art and our thoughts are diverted towards the cave sites of Lascaux in south west France or Altamira in northern Spain.

Yet within the British Isles is a large assemblage of rock art, mainly in open-air locations that numbers around 6,000 individual sites.

This one-day lecture will trace the origins of this unique archaeological phenomenon, focusing on a number of sites that reveal something of the mindset of prehistoric communities who created, venerated and worshipped these enigmatic places and the landscapes in which they stand.

Led by Dr George Nash, archaeologist and specialist in prehistoric and contemporary art, Erasmus Mundus Professor of the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, convener of the Welsh Rock Art Organisation and Research Fellow, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Bristol.

Archaeological study days

Bristol Museum has run a programme of study days since 2013 and an archaeological field school since 2019. Profits from study days and the field school help support the work of Bristol Museum.

Study Days are based at Bristol Museum, Blaise Museum or M Shed. Each session focusses on a different aspect of archaeology and is led by an expert in their field. Depending on the subject, the day usually involves a mix of illustrated presentations, practical activities, behind the scenes tours and/or a chance to study collections not usually on display.

All sessions are suitable for complete beginners to those who have studied archaeology before but are keen to find out more. They are open to everyone aged 16 and over.

The study day programme and field schools are directed by Kate Iles, Curator of Archaeology. For more information or to join our mailing list please contact kate.iles@bristol.gov.uk


Archaeology at Ashton Court - Family Field School

Bristol Museum                4th July 2020
   Bristol       4th July 2020
   Field School
   Various
Family Field School

Dig into the past and discover what archaeology is all about in this family friendly session.
 
Find out what archaeologists really do, get to know your trowel from your topsoil and spend time as a family on the Ashton Court Estate. Each session involves games and activities that help explain how archaeology works and the chance have a go at excavating a real archaeological site. A must for all budding archaeologists (and their parents).
 
Suitable for children aged 8-16. All children must be accompanied by at least one paying adult. Maximum of two children per adult and two adults per child. Adults without children cannot participate in this session.
 
Field schools at Ashton Court
 
The 2020 field schools provide a unique opportunity to find out what archaeology really involves, learn useful skills, meet new people, experience a real dig and discover a whole range of exciting post-excavation techniques. All profits help support the work of Bristol Museum and help us to offer archaeological experiences to young people.
 
Each field school will take you through the whole archaeological process from choosing where to dig to what happens after excavations end. They offer a unique experience to help excavate Ashton Court, one of Bristol’s most iconic landmarks and a chance to go behind the scenes at Bristol Museum. Sessions include the theory behind archaeology; what happens out on site; how artefacts are recorded, studied and looked after; scientific techniques; and how to find out more.
 
Field schools are directed by Bristol Museum and led by experienced experts. Sessions are suitable for complete beginners to those who have studied archaeology before but are keen to find out more. They are open to everyone aged 16 and over.
 
For more information on any of our field schools or our corporate packages please contact field school director Kate Iles, Curator of Archaeology for Bristol Culture & Creative Industries - kate.iles@bristol.gov.uk
 
About the site
 
Ashton Court is a Grade I listed manor house on the outskirts of the vibrant city of Bristol, England. It has been the site of a manor house for around 1000 years. The house has been changed and remodelled many times and from 1545 to 1946 was home to the wealthy Smyth family.
 
During the dry summer of 2018 a series of parch marks appeared on the South Lawn. A geophysical survey was commissioned and the results revealed what was thought to be the remains of an earlier stable block. Archaeological excavations followed and between June-July 2019 an intriguing series of walls were uncovered. 
 
The 2020 season will continue to investigate the South Lawn to try to understand the archaeology of this important site. Excavations will focus on revealing more of Ashton Court’s earlier buildings to try to find out when they were built, what they were used for and how they looked.
 
To discover other archaeological opportunities at Ashton Court and the work of local archaeology company Archeoscan, visit www.archeoscan.com
 

Archaeology at Ashton Court - Mini Field School

Bristol Museum                11th-12th July 2020
   Bristol       11th-12th July 2020
   Field School
   £120/£130
Mini Field School

This two day taster course will introduce how archaeology works, the skills involved and the work that happens once excavations are over. It includes one day excavating at Ashton Court and a behind the scenes tour of Bristol Museum.
 
Day one:
Morning session -Find out about the skills, techniques and theories involved in fieldwork with archaeologists from Bristol Museum and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.
 
Afternoon session - Discover what happens to objects and information once excavations are over and take a behind the scenes tour.
 
Day two: Get hands on and help excavate Ashton Court with local archaeology company Archeoscan.  Supervisors will be on hand to show you the basic techniques and help you throughout.
Day one will be based at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery and will run from 10.30 am – 4pm. Day two will be on-site at Ashton Court and will run from 10am – 4pm.

Field schools
 
The 2020 field schools provide a unique opportunity to find out what archaeology really involves, learn useful skills, meet new people, experience a real dig and discover a whole range of exciting post-excavation techniques. All profits help support the work of Bristol Museum and help us to offer archaeological experiences to young people.
 
Each field school will take you through the whole archaeological process from choosing where to dig to what happens after excavations end. They offer a unique experience to help excavate Ashton Court, one of Bristol’s most iconic landmarks and a chance to go behind the scenes at Bristol Museum. Sessions include the theory behind archaeology; what happens out on site; how artefacts are recorded, studied and looked after; scientific techniques; and how to find out more.
 
Field schools are directed by Bristol Museum and led by experienced experts. Sessions are suitable for complete beginners to those who have studied archaeology before but are keen to find out more. They are open to everyone aged 16 and over.
 
For more information on any of our field schools or our corporate packages please contact field school director Kate Iles, Curator of Archaeology for Bristol Culture & Creative Industries - kate.iles@bristol.gov.uk
 
About the site
 
Ashton Court is a Grade I listed manor house on the outskirts of the vibrant city of Bristol, England. It has been the site of a manor house for around 1000 years. The house has been changed and remodelled many times and from 1545 to 1946 was home to the wealthy Smyth family.
 
During the dry summer of 2018 a series of parch marks appeared on the South Lawn. A geophysical survey was commissioned and the results revealed what was thought to be the remains of an earlier stable block. Archaeological excavations followed and between June-July 2019 an intriguing series of walls were uncovered. 
 
The 2020 season will continue to investigate the South Lawn to try to understand the archaeology of this important site. Excavations will focus on revealing more of Ashton Court’s earlier buildings to try to find out when they were built, what they were used for and how they looked.
 
To discover other archaeological opportunities at Ashton Court and the work of local archaeology company Archeoscan, visit www.archeoscan.com
 
 

Archaeology at Ashton Court - Full Field School Experience

Bristol Museum                6th – 10th July 2020
   Bristol       6th – 10th July 2020
   Field School
   £240/260
This five day field school will take you through the whole archaeological process from where to dig to what happens after the excavation ends. It includes two full days excavating at Ashton Court, sessions on historic buildings and how to research a site as well as behind the scenes tours of Bristol Museum, Bristol Archives and the historic interior of Ashton Court.
 
Day one: Find out about the skills, techniques and theories involved in fieldwork with archaeologists from Bristol Museum and the Portable Antiquities Scheme.
 
Day two:
Morning session – Become an archaeological building detective with Wessex Archaeology, one of the UK’s leading archaeological companies. Learn how modern technology is used by archaeologists to record standing buildings and their interiors. Photograph the historic interior of Ashton Court and turn photos into 3D models using photogrammetry. This session also includes a tour of the rooms not usually open to the public.
 
Afternoon session – Learn how archaeologists use archives, records, images and datasets to research sites before archaeological investigation begins. This session includes a behind the scenes tour of Bristol Archives and a chance to see highlights from the Ashton Court archives.
 
Days three & four: Get hands on and help excavate Ashton Court with Archeoscan, a local company providing opportunities for community involvement in archaeology.  There will also be a chance to have a go at surveying using a total station and to help record the site by creating plans and section drawings following archaeological conventions. Supervisors will be on hand to show you the basic techniques and help you throughout.
 
Day five: Discover what happens to objects and information once excavations are over with staff from Bristol Museum and the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Find out how artefacts are recorded, studied and looked after before learning about the scientific techniques that can help us to understand the past. This session includes a behind the scenes tour of the museum.
 
Days one and five will be based at Bristol Museum & Art Gallery and will run from 10.30 am – 4pm. Days two, three and four will be on-site at Ashton Court and will run from 10am – 4pm.

Ashton Court Field Schools
 
The 2020 field schools provide a unique opportunity to find out what archaeology really involves, learn useful skills, meet new people, experience a real dig and discover a whole range of exciting post-excavation techniques. All profits help support the work of Bristol Museum and help us to offer archaeological experiences to young people.
 
Each field school will take you through the whole archaeological process from choosing where to dig to what happens after excavations end. They offer a unique experience to help excavate Ashton Court, one of Bristol’s most iconic landmarks and a chance to go behind the scenes at Bristol Museum. Sessions include the theory behind archaeology; what happens out on site; how artefacts are recorded, studied and looked after; scientific techniques; and how to find out more.
 
Field schools are directed by Bristol Museum and led by experienced experts. Sessions are suitable for complete beginners to those who have studied archaeology before but are keen to find out more. They are open to everyone aged 16 and over.
 
For more information on any of our field schools or our corporate packages please contact field school director Kate Iles, Curator of Archaeology for Bristol Culture & Creative Industries - kate.iles@bristol.gov.uk
 
About the site
 
Ashton Court is a Grade I listed manor house on the outskirts of the vibrant city of Bristol, England. It has been the site of a manor house for around 1000 years. The house has been changed and remodelled many times and from 1545 to 1946 was home to the wealthy Smyth family.
 
During the dry summer of 2018 a series of parch marks appeared on the South Lawn. A geophysical survey was commissioned and the results revealed what was thought to be the remains of an earlier stable block. Archaeological excavations followed and between June-July 2019 an intriguing series of walls were uncovered. 
 
The 2020 season will continue to investigate the South Lawn to try to understand the archaeology of this important site. Excavations will focus on revealing more of Ashton Court’s earlier buildings to try to find out when they were built, what they were used for and how they looked.
 
To discover other archaeological opportunities at Ashton Court and the work of local archaeology company Archeoscan, visit www.archeoscan.com
 

Advanced Lidar for Historic Environment Professionals

PTS Consultancy with Air Photo Services                8th-9th october 2020
   Shaftesbury Centre, Swindon       8th-9th october 2020
   2 day CIFA Approved Training Course
   £500

If you want to get the best out of the Environment Agency point cloud data, this 2-day course covers every step from point cloud to 3D visualisation. Taught through a mixture of presentations, practical guidance and hands on sessions, our CIFA Approved Advanced Lidar course is aimed at those who want to improve their understanding of how the data can be comissioned, processed and shared with clients.

Day 1
- Introduction to the point cloud – formats and attributes
- Viewing and assessing the quality of point cloud data
- Classifying the point cloud
- Generating surface and terrain models
- Understanding and creating intensity images

Day 2
- Generating mask layers
- Commissioning lidar survey
- Advanced raster processing for enhancing microtopography
- 3D wed visualisations to share with colleagues and clients

Visit our website to download the course information sheet and to book your place.


 


Lidar at the Desk and in the Field

PTS Consultancy with Air Photo Services                14th-15 May 2020
   Shaftesbury Centre, Swindon (Day 2 on site in Wiltshire)       14th-15 May 2020
   2 day CIFA Approved Training Course
   £250

The course complements the Making the Most of Lidar course presentations and practicals on day one with the option to spend the day out on site, putting your new-found lidar interpretation skills into practice!

On day 1 you'll learn all about lidar through a series of presentations, practical guidance and hands on sessions this course will explore how to access, prepare, and manipulate digital lidar data. We’ll be covering current best practise for visualising the data as well as lots of practical exercises.

On day 2 we will explore a landscape within 1hr of Swindon and make field observations of a range of features identified in the lidar data processed on day one. This exercise in taking observations from desk to field greatly enhances the interpretation of the data, leading to improved understanding of what can (and cannot) be identified using lidar. There will be lots of opportunity to discuss ideas and issues faced when combining remote data and field observations.

PTS Consultancy and Air Photo Services will be running this popular course in May, so visit our website for our course information sheet and to book your place!


Public Inquiry Workshop

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 25-Friday 27 November 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 25-Friday 27 November 2020
   CPD
   From £496.00
This course will take the form of a practical workshop carefully designed to improve the performance of anyone who might be called upon to participate in a Public Inquiry concerned with the historic environment. The aims will be to present the terms of procedure, the roles of the participants and the general feel of a public inquiry. A mock public Inquiry will be mounted using a genuine case study. Training for potential witnesses will be given in how to prepare evidence for a Public Inquiry, how to produce proofs of evidence and to experience them being given and tested under realistic conditions. Before the course, you will receive a study pack including a guide to the preparation of evidence. You will be allocated a role to play in the Inquiry and asked to prepare a proof of evidence to fit this role. You will be asked to indicate your area of interest or expertise in advance of the course so that roles can be appropriately assigned. Active participation in the course will be limited to 12 participants. There will also be a limited number of places available for observers who do not wish to play an active part. Observers will receive the study pack, attend the sessions and participate in the Inquiry as members of the public. The Inquiry will be video recorded to allow an analysis and feedback to be given on the final day. Please note that the Wednesday evening session may extend beyond 9.00pm, so we recommend that all participants book a residential place or arrange accommodation in/near Oxford. Because of the need to do preparatory work before the course, the closing date for applications will be Tuesday 27 October 2020 at 10.00am.

Project Management in Archaeology: an Introduction

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Thursday 8 October 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Thursday 8 October 2020
   CPD
   From £222.00
Project management has become a core function for those working at senior levels within the historic environment sector, but many historic environment professionals still progress into management roles with little or no formal management training. This course will focus on project management as a distinctive skill-set, and introduce techniques to help participants understand, plan for and manage some of the key challenges that typically affect projects in the sector. It is designed for those who are new to the project management role and will draw on the extensive experience of the tutors in development-led archaeology. While some familiarity with development-led archaeology will be beneficial, the course will be relevant to those taking on project management roles generally within the historic environment sector. The course does not cover Health and Safety management.

Heritage Values and the Assessment of Significance

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 23-Friday 25 September 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 23-Friday 25 September 2020
   CPD
   From £472.00
Significance is now a core concept within our planning process. Its assessment is a key part of management and of development within the historic environment. This course will introduce the process, show you what is involved in preparing assessments of significance, teach you how to read and judge such assessments, and explore the ways in which they can be used. At the end, you should be convinced about the value of significance as a planning and management tool

Photographing Historic Buildings

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 16 and Thursday 17 September 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 16 and Thursday 17 September 2020
   CPD
   From £455.00
Digital cameras have greatly changed the way we record our architectural history, simplifying the process and reducing the cost of image capture thereby, encouraging a scatter-gun method of photography. This course will look at ways of taking a more considered approach to the use of our cameras and what we seek to capture. The course is aimed at those who are not professional photographers but have an interest in or need to photograph historic buildings for the record using a digital camera. By the end of the course students will be expected to know how to choose the right viewpoint, the right lighting conditions, correctly set up their own cameras to capture suitable images and how to post-produce images in software so that they will create images ready for the archive. Places are limited to 12, so early booking is strongly advised. Please bring your own camera. National Occupational Standards for Town Planning/Conservation/Building Control: Contributes to the performance requirements for COSTPCBC56.1-B5.2 Analyse, research and report on historic and heritage assets in conservation.

Condition Surveys of Historic Buildings

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 1-Friday 3 July 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 1-Friday 3 July 2020
   CPD
   From £472.00
Condition surveys of historic buildings require an understanding of architectural and construction history, as well as the ability to analyse and prioritise defects. This course aims to give participants an understanding of traditional construction and its defects and to provide the skills to carry out balanced and informed surveys of historic buildings. The course is designed for built environment professionals who are responsible for the repair, maintenance and management of heritage assets, public sector planning and conservation professionals, and owners of heritage assets. National Occupational Standards for Archaeology: Supports the Performance and Knowledge requirements for CCSAPAD2 Assess options for conserving the archaeological resource in situ. National Occupational Standards for Town Planning/Conservation/Building Control: contributes to the Performance and Knowledge requirements for COSTPCBC56.1-B5.2 Analyse, research and report on historic and heritage assets in conservation; COSTPCBC56.3-B56.4 Develop and advise on conservation, repair and maintenance strategies and solutions; and COSBEDCL4O14 Survey, assess and record the condition of assets in conservation.

Delivering Public Benefit through Archaeology

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Friday 26 June 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Friday 26 June 2020
   CPD
   From £222.00
The public value of the historic environment is recognised in planning policy across the UK, professional bodies require their members to work in the public interest, funding bodies expect the public to benefit from publicly funded archaeological work. But how do the public benefit from our work? How can we plan consistently to deliver public benefit and to communicate that benefit effectively? Do we know how to evaluate the impact of our work in delivering public benefit? This course will develop the confidence of delegates to answer these questions and to design programmes of work that genuinely serve the public interest. The course is aimed at all archaeologists/historic environment professionals responsible for commissioning, specifying and/or delivering programmes of work which aim to deliver public benefit.

Churches: History, Significance and Use

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 27 and Thursday 28 May 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 27 and Thursday 28 May 2020
   CPD
   From £387.00
The course provides a firm foundation of the history of church architecture and furnishings, and provides the skills to draft statements of significance. This will enable participants to analyse and evaluate proposals for change. The course will be of interest and value to all who would like to learn about the development of churches, but is aimed particularly at those who are actively involved in the management of church buildings and the presentation of church buildings to visitors. The focus of the course will be on Anglican church buildings. Contributes to the Knowledge and Understanding requirements for CCSAPAC1 Research and analyse information to achieve objectives; CCSAPAD1 Characterise the archaeological resource and provide management advice. National Occupational Standards for Town Planning/Conservation/Building Control: contributes to the Performance and Knowledge requirements for COSTPCBC56.1-B5.2 Analyse, research and report on historic and heritage assets in conservation; COSTPCBC56.3-B56.4 Develop and advise on conservation, repair and maintenance strategies and solutions; and COSBEDCL4O14 Survey, assess and record the condition of assets in conservation.

Heritage Research: skills and sources

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 13 May 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 13 May 2020
   CPD
   From £222.00
Carrying out research on heritage assets, such as archaeological sites, historic buildings or ruins, can be daunting and knowing what material is available and where to start can be a real challenge. This course aims to introduce you to the research sources available online, in archives, museums and libraries, and help you develop the skills needed to work with these sources. It will also introduce the types of information that you can collect from simple field surveys, and how scientific methods can aid heritage research projects. The course will be cross-cutting and provide a good foundation in research involving both arts and sciences. The course will be useful to anyone engaged professionally with heritage assets including students engaged in heritage-related research projects. For those with long professional experience it should provide updates on newer research sources, and for those at an earlier career stage it should provide useful new information on both sources and the skills to handle them. The course will also provide some hands-on experience, the opportunity to share experience and skills with other participants, and some advice on how to access further information and training. To find out more about Oxford University's Heritage Network click the link below: https://heritage.web.ox.ac.uk/

The Setting of Heritage Assets and Places

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Wednesday 6 and Thursday 7 May 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Wednesday 6 and Thursday 7 May 2020
   CPD
   From £387.00
The setting of buildings, monuments and historic areas is fundamental to how people appreciate their cultural value and significance. But it is a complex and contentious issue for decision-makers. In the context of official guidance and wide-ranging experience of practical casework, this course explains why the setting of historic places matters, and the principles and practical skills of sound assessment and decision-making. The course will be of particular interest to those involved with heritage issues in planning decisions, especially major developments affecting sensitive locations. Such involvement could be as planning or heritage consultants; planning officers; agency regulators; historic environment curators; or representatives of amenity societies or other voluntary bodies. It will also be of use to those who commission studies such as conservation plans, heritage assessments or specialist studies for strategic and project scale environmental assessments.

Stratigraphic Analysis in Archaeology

Oxford University Dept for Continuing Education                Thursday 30 April 2020
   Rewley House Oxford       Thursday 30 April 2020
   CPD
   From £222.00
The excavation and analysis of archaeological sites is based on stratigraphic principles that provide a consistent framework for identifying, recording, sequencing and interpreting what is found. Most archaeologists today work with this approach, and the ‘context sheet’ and stratigraphic matrix are as essential as the trowel in the modern archaeologist’s toolkit. However, many archaeological sites reveal very complex sequences of hundreds or even thousands of different natural and man-made deposits and events, and ordering them into a coherent site narrative can be a very challenging process. This course is designed to develop your skills in post-excavation stratigraphic analysis. Starting with a review of first principles, we will look at how sites form through a combination of natural processes and human interventions. We will then review core principles of archaeological stratigraphy, the construction of a stratigraphic matrix and the first stages of analysis as contexts are brought together into meaningful groups. We will then look at how dating information is applied, and groups are combined in discrete phases of activity to form the first building blocks of a site narrative. The methods taught can be applied to any archaeological site; however, the course will focus upon complex urban stratigraphy, which presents the greatest challenges. The course is designed for those who are familiar with the processes of excavation and stratigraphic recording, and are looking to develop their skills in the post-excavation stages of analysis, dating, and interpretation. The course will comprise a combination of presentations to explain theory and approaches, and practical sessions providing opportunities for participants to work with real data. The course tutors have many years’ experience of analysing and describing complex stratigraphy and offer a wealth of practical help and insights.



If there is anything you want to knowabout courses, please call me on 0787 6528 498 or 01368 840 847 or email me at - info@bajr.org